bcfurs:

"i’ve never watched lord of the rings"

image

"there’s no character development"

image

"the movies are too long"

image

"it doesn’t even make sense"

image

drcabl3:

jessicreep:

kittydoom:

A Multi-Function Clip That Hides a Toolbox In Your Hair

Um yes!

I still want to bulk buy these and adonize  batch pink.

drcabl3:

jessicreep:

kittydoom:

A Multi-Function Clip That Hides a Toolbox In Your Hair

Um yes!

I still want to bulk buy these and adonize  batch pink.

erikkwakkel:

Funny medieval doodles

With their wild hair and frantic gaze, these doodled men look like fools. They are waving as if to seek contact with the reader. The thing is, the reader is busy singing and listening to a sermon. That is because these 800-year-old images are found in a Missal, a book used during Holy Mass. What a shock it must have been for the serious user of the book, to flip the page and suddenly find yourself face to face with these funny creatures. And what a great contrast: a serious book with silly drawings.

Pic: Paris, Bibliothèque Sainte-Geneviève, MS 95 (Missal, 12th century). More about the manuscript here.

aorticinkwell:

THOR
I like her design… Please don’t hurt me

aorticinkwell:

THOR

I like her design… Please don’t hurt me


Oregon, United States by Otromira
victoriousvocabulary:

FEY
[adjective]
1. a) having or displaying an otherworldly, magical, or fairylike aspect or quality; enchanting. b) having visionary power; clairvoyant; attuned to the supernatural. c) appearing touched or crazy, as if under a spell; slightly insane; whimsical; strange.
2. Scots: a) fated to die soon; doomed. b) full of the sense of approaching death; in a state of high spirits or unusual excitement, formerly believed to presage death.
Etymology: Middle English; Old English fǣge - doomed to die; Old Saxon fēgi, Old High German feigi, Old Norse feigr.
[Michel Ogier]

victoriousvocabulary:

FEY

[adjective]

1. a) having or displaying an otherworldly, magical, or fairylike aspect or quality; enchanting. b) having visionary power; clairvoyant; attuned to the supernatural. c) appearing touched or crazy, as if under a spell; slightly insane; whimsical; strange.

2. Scots: a) fated to die soon; doomed. b) full of the sense of approaching death; in a state of high spirits or unusual excitement, formerly believed to presage death.

Etymology: Middle English; Old English fǣge - doomed to die; Old Saxon fēgi, Old High German feigi, Old Norse feigr.

[Michel Ogier]

friend: i watched an episode of the thing you like
me: oh god
me: i am about to tell you literally everything about the thing
engineeringisawesome:

This 3D-Printed Cast Uses Ultrasound to Heal Your Bones 40% Faster

3D-printed casts (an idea that’s been around for a couple years now) could alleviate the odor and itch issues caused by plaster casts, but even though they’re not widely available yet,Turkish student Deniz Karasahin has already taken the idea a step further. winner of the 2014 Golden A’Design Award, Karasahin’s Osteoid cast prototype uses tiny ultrasonic vibrations to speed up bone healing time by up to 40 percent.
The bone healing capabilities of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) have been known for decades, but the treatment is difficult to administer because it requires ultrasound leads to be placed on the skin, directly over the injured area of the bone. With traditional plaster casts this is basically impossible, but a 3D-printed cast that leaves patches of skin open would make it easy. Osteoid’s simple, skeletal design allows ultrasonic drivers to be built directly into the cast.
It’s still just a design prototype at this point, but given the rapid pace at which 3D scanning and printing technologies are progressing, we wouldn’t be surprised to start seeing these kinds of casts adorning the arms of reckless people all over the globe within the next year or two.

Digital Trends

engineeringisawesome:

This 3D-Printed Cast Uses Ultrasound to Heal Your Bones 40% Faster

3D-printed casts (an idea that’s been around for a couple years now) could alleviate the odor and itch issues caused by plaster casts, but even though they’re not widely available yet,Turkish student Deniz Karasahin has already taken the idea a step further. winner of the 2014 Golden A’Design Award, Karasahin’s Osteoid cast prototype uses tiny ultrasonic vibrations to speed up bone healing time by up to 40 percent.

The bone healing capabilities of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) have been known for decades, but the treatment is difficult to administer because it requires ultrasound leads to be placed on the skin, directly over the injured area of the bone. With traditional plaster casts this is basically impossible, but a 3D-printed cast that leaves patches of skin open would make it easy. Osteoid’s simple, skeletal design allows ultrasonic drivers to be built directly into the cast.

It’s still just a design prototype at this point, but given the rapid pace at which 3D scanning and printing technologies are progressing, we wouldn’t be surprised to start seeing these kinds of casts adorning the arms of reckless people all over the globe within the next year or two.

Digital Trends

viα unexplained-events: Art from the book A Monster Calls written by Patrick Ness and illustrated by Jim Kay.

It’s a children’s book about a boy (Conor) who starts having nightmares about a monster every night since his mother started her cancer treatment. One night when he wakes up, there is an actual monster right outside his window. The monster is a yew tree in the cemetery behind Conor’s house during day-time but the monster we see at night. I wont go into more detail about the story because it’s really worth reading. You might want to have some tissues and ice-cream ready though. It was inspired by Siobhan Dowd, who passed away due to cancer and could not write this book herself. 

tothless:

imagine elves with freckles being looked upon with wonder and amazement because it is said that they are born with stars on their skin

emberises:

I can’t fucking handle Deadpool and Spider-Man